Monthly Archives: April 2020

What Is the Difference Between a Table Saw and a Panel Beam Saw?

In smaller shops, most panel sizing is done with smaller sliding or fixed table saws. However, for shops with a higher volume of pieces required in their operations, panel or beam saws are more suitable.

Table Saws

Table saws are categorized as fixed table saws and sliding table saws. Fixed table saws come in a variety of sizes from small 8-inch hobby machines up to heavy-duty 14-inch industrial machines. They also range in power from 3HP to 10HP. Smaller ones run on single-phase for home-based wood shops while the larger machines run on 3-phase electricity for industrial environments. Fixed table saws are typically used to cut solid wood or smaller composite panels. Some utilize a scoring saw for clean cuts when cutting panels. They generally are equipped with a tilting arbour to perform angle cutting between 45 and 90 degrees.

Sliding table saws are used in small industrial production shops. They are also used for special custom cutting in a large industrial shop that also has a beam panel saw to do most of their panel cutting. They tend to be very versatile having a tilting arbour as well as a mitre fence for angle and mitre cutting, respectively. These sawing machines usually are equipped with a scoring saw. The sliding table allows 5-foot or 10-foot (more common) sheets to travel while supported on the sliding table. The sliding table allows the operator to more smoothly advance the sheet through the cutting saw. Sliding table saws range in power from about 5HP to 12HP. Although some have electronic setup assistance, most of them do not.

Popular brands of table saws include: Altendorf, Antec by Joway, Bauerle, Boss, Casadei, Casolin, Concord, Delta, EMA, Griggio, Holz-Her, Italcava, Lazzari, Magic, Martin, Ortza, Paoloni, Poitras, RGA Italtalcava, Robland, SCMI, Sicar, Stema, and Wadkin.

Panel / Beam Saws

A panel saw or beam saw is an industrial machine the makes linear cuts in pre-manufactured sheets or boards. These saws encompass a wide variety of horizontal saws from manually operated to automatically controlled. These machines are used to cut wood-based materials such as plywood, particle board, medium density fiber (MDF), oriented strand board (OSB) and high density fiber (HDF) sheets.

Cabinet shops, furniture makers, fixture manufacturers, and many other companies use panel saws as one of the first steps in their production process to cut full-sized sheets of material into the smaller rectangular sizes needed to produce their products. Some beam saws are specially configured to cut plastic, phenolic and non-ferrous metal sheets as well. Beam saws can be loaded manually from the out feed side of the machine or automatically from a lift table at the rear of the machine. They can have a single cutting line (single saw) or can have multiple cutting lines known as angular sizing systems or plants. Panel saws are able to cut single sheets as thin as 3mm or up to stacks of sheets as high as 8 inches depending on the configuration of the machine.

Popular panel saw brands include: Casadei, EMA, Gabbiani, Giben, Holz-Her, Holzma, Homag, Schelling, SCM, and Selco.

Sewing Machines: A Brief History of the Merrow Sewing Machine Company

Founded in 1838, The Merrow Machine Company is a leading manufacturer of sewing machines. The company was established by Mr. Joseph Merrow, a gunpowder manufacturer. Today Merrow is one of the largest and most popular suppliers of textile sewing equipment and industrial sergers. The company not only creates quality overlock machines, but customizes them for specific applications. Tens of thousands of people from all over the world are using Merrow sewing machines for their reliability and uncompromised quality.

The Merrow Machine Company has evolved from a knitting mill to the world’s largest manufacturer of overlock machines. Mr. Joseph Merrow became interested in manufacturing gunpowder and built a powder mill in the early 19th century. The mill was destroyed by an explosion in 1837, so Mr. Merrow has built a knitting factory on the same site. The factory quickly became the first business of its kind in the country.

The knitted goods were made of native wool that was sorted, picked, dyed, scoured, spun into yarn, and then knitted into hosiery. The final product was shipped to retail stores throughout New England. Sewing machines were also being created in the machine shop in conjunction with the knitting business. In 1887, a fire destroyed the knitting mill once again. In the next years, the company has focused solely on creating superior overlock machines that last longer.

In 1905, The Merrow Machine Company had agents in 35 countries. The first line of “A Class” machines was created in 1932. Joseph M. Merrow continued as president of the company until his death in 1947. A new type of sewing machine was patented in 1955. In 1964, the company expanded operations in the South by opening Franklin Industries in Georgia. The Merrow Machine Company continued to be a leading designer manufacturer, and distributor of industrial machines throughout the 20th century. Today the company is operated by brothers Charlie and Owen Merrow. Their machines wear better, last longer, and have better seams.

In 2004, this manufacturer changed its name to The Merrow Sewing Machine Company. The people who run the company are proud to continue its tradition of precision engineering and innovation in the 21st century. New models of overlock machines are built every year. In 2010, custom industrial sewing machines were added to its standard product line. The company is now based in Fall River, Massachusetts. Its customers can still order parts for machines constructed in the 1800s.

Industrial Applications of Machine Vision Systems

Machine vision systems are one of the most definitive technological advance in the recent years. Today it is used to keep track of the machine-related operations and their applications, which can make the consumer experience better. Using this technology, the industries and manufacturing units are collecting data daily and are making their processes more effective in every way.

There are many applications that the machine vision technology has in different fields like:

Inspection

One of the biggest applications of the machine vision systems is inspecting the manufacturing lines and other areas of a unit in all kinds of industries. Starting from the identification of parts until the very last assembly and packaging, any error can cause a major setback for the entire line. However, with these systems, the efficiency has increased many folds as the computer systems can identify the aberrations and faulty products. The images of the defective products are captured, which are then logged into the systems and at the end of the line, they get removed easily.

Maintenance

Predictive maintenance has become a real thing after the machine vision systems have come into view. In an industry, machines are used daily, and they are also prone to getting damaged and faulty. In case the entire machine breaks down it can cause a major financial setback for the unit. However, with machine vision systems, the data is collected to identify signals and notify before any major breakdown.

Assembly

In those manufacturing and assembly units which have a huge capacity and run day and night, it is important to make sure that the final assembled products adhere to the standards. There are many aspects of assembly like printing, sealing of the bottles or packets, the position of the caps, labeling, etc. which need to be taken care of. Machine vision systems are used to get a complete 360-degree view of the process, which will increase the productivity and quality of production.

Barcode reading

In smaller equipment or parts there is always a barcode given which can identify each product separately from the other. Initially reading the bar codes during the final testing was done manually. But this became a time costing process and also came with many human errors. Thus now machine vision systems are used, which read the bar codes automatically saving both time and cost.

3D inspection

In many industries, there are bigger and smaller components that are joined together to get a final product like electronics, automobiles, etc. However to make sure that the connections and assembly are not done in a faulty way, the three-dimensional inspection should take place. Machine vision cameras and computers capture high definition images which can create a 3D image of the components. This will not only help in understanding the parts and their circuitry, it will also help in reducing defects in the product.

These systems are of major importance these days as they have reduced the operation and inspection costs by many folds. Not only they help in fault detection but have also made the units more automated.

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Choosing Industrial Machine Lighting: Technical Tips

Typical lighting options simply don't work well in industrial environments. For those who work with heavy machinery, great lighting is a necessity. Illumination is vital to the machining process, both for quality control and safety reasons. Without adequate light, it can be difficult to judge precision placement or to evaluate the quality of the piece as it makes its way through a line. A dedicated press light, mill light or drill light is an essential – but finding an industrial light that can hold up to the vibrations and punishment in the typical manufacturing environment isn't easy. These technical tips and information can help you make the right choice for your industrial lighting needs.

Differences in Industrial Machine Lighting

Industrial machine lighting available comes in many different types. The differences among them include the type of bulb, the type of housing and the type of fixtures. All of them have benefits and drawbacks that make them best suited for particular applications. One of your best guides for choosing the right industrial lights for your needs is to seek out units that are designed specifically for the type of use you have in mind: that is, choose a drill light for mounting on drills, a press light for mounting on presses and a mill light for use with industrial milling equipment.

Narrowing Your Choices

Once you've singled out the specific use you'll have for your lights, you'll still have some decisions to make. The single best way to get the right machine lighting is to let an expert guide you to the right choice. Most manufacturers or distributors of industrial machine lighting can determine the best type of lights for your needs by asking just a few simple questions. Their advice can form the basis of the factors you'll want to consider when choosing industrial lighting for your facility.

Output

These days, figuring output can be a little confusing. It used to be a simple matter of choosing higher-wattage lighting for more light. Even now, the lumen can help you choose lights that put out more illumination – but it may not be a terribly useful measurement when you need to measure directed light. With machine lights, it's important to know the difference between LED and fluorescent output to help you determine whether a particular style or type of industrial machine light will put out the amount of light you need for your application.

How Will You Use It?

The way you intend to use the machine light can help you determine important factors and features for your light, including length and output, whether you intend to mount the light or whether it will be hand-held, whether it will be hard-wired or Plugged into an outlet, and whether you need to shield it from caustic liquids such as solvents, oil or chlorine based fluids used in the manufacturing process. All of these will help you choose the best model and make of industrial lighting for your needs.

Energy Use

Different types of fixtures and bulbs use different amounts of energy. It's important to balance your industrial machine lighting needs with your need for energy efficiency.